Making a Dome shade/screen

When it gets hot (30c+) you make a shade cover and when the mosquitos come in you make a screen. Put the two needs together and shazam! You’ve got a burlap sack thing.

yurt shade cover and mosquito net up close

We bought a 24′ by 3′ roll of burlap cloth which makes about a two layered 8′ by 8.5′ piece. We think it keeps the bugs out (some must get in through the door though) and the two layers sewn together (on a sewing machine woooh!) block some sun from entering the yurt.

Cooking on the outdoor kitchen or fire pit is also essential for keeping the yurt cool these days.

Since the dome opens and closes some 18'' we needed the material to be able to "stretch" but also not leave gaps where mosquitos could get in. Burlap is the way to go. When is deteriorates we can compost it!

Since the dome opens and closes some 18” we needed the material to be able to “stretch” but also not leave gaps where mosquitos could get in. Burlap is the way to go. When is deteriorates we can compost it!

A plant acting as a weight for one of the corners of the yurt shade cover/mosquito net

A plant acting as a weight for one of the corners of the yurt shade cover/mosquito net. In the photo above you can see a pink bottle (near the chair) hanging from another corner of the burlap cover.

 

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yurts and snow

Will the snow slide off the roof or will we need to shovel it?

Will the snow slide off the roof or will we need to shovel it?

We wondered about over wintering with the yurt.

How will the yurt support the weight of snow?

At what angle should we make the roof in order to facilitate snow removal?

My mom wondered if we needed an inside pole to support the crown wheel in case heavy snow accumulated.

Well its winter now and we know a few things.

A winter picture will follow soon.

And here is is…

yurt tarp roof, snow

December 2013, the snow slides off easily this yurt tarp roof

The snow slides off the roof tarp It dislodges and slides right off making a loud scratching avalanche sound from inside the yurt. So far we’ve removed snow once with a long shovel. Perhaps the 22 degree angle roof is steep enough.  We do not need a crown wheel support.

I wonder do other yurters with tarp roofs in snow bearing regions also experience this phenomena?

 

Roof tarp fitting

We’ve been plastic welding the tarp seams like the one bellow with a modified heat gun.

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In order to look like this:

Can you spot the weld line?

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Welding loops on the inside tarp
So we can pass a rope through. Soon ut will serve to sinch tight the exterior wall canvas

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And then cutting, gathering- pulling taught and welding the areas that are not lying flat.

Gotta love the implied nudity.

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Geometry lesson: Sewing the roof canvas

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For the roof inside cover we used painters drop cloth.

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30’x28′ rectangle of canvas seen up of four 12’x15′ and two
4’x15′ pieces.

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Cutting out the hole for the skylight and the extra pie slice to be used to finish the edges.

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Jed sews too!

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The final edge…. Sigh 🙂