Making a Dome shade/screen

When it gets hot (30c+) you make a shade cover and when the mosquitos come in you make a screen. Put the two needs together and shazam! You’ve got a burlap sack thing.

yurt shade cover and mosquito net up close

We bought a 24′ by 3′ roll of burlap cloth which makes about a two layered 8′ by 8.5′ piece. We think it keeps the bugs out (some must get in through the door though) and the two layers sewn together (on a sewing machine woooh!) block some sun from entering the yurt.

Cooking on the outdoor kitchen or fire pit is also essential for keeping the yurt cool these days.

Since the dome opens and closes some 18'' we needed the material to be able to "stretch" but also not leave gaps where mosquitos could get in. Burlap is the way to go. When is deteriorates we can compost it!

Since the dome opens and closes some 18” we needed the material to be able to “stretch” but also not leave gaps where mosquitos could get in. Burlap is the way to go. When is deteriorates we can compost it!

A plant acting as a weight for one of the corners of the yurt shade cover/mosquito net

A plant acting as a weight for one of the corners of the yurt shade cover/mosquito net. In the photo above you can see a pink bottle (near the chair) hanging from another corner of the burlap cover.

 

Winter: How much wood does it take to warm a yurt?

First question that people ask about yurt living:

– Are you keeping warm in the yurt?

First thing people say when they walk in the yurt:

– Wow its cozy in here (with a look of astonishment) do you burn a lot of wood?

winter

I took this winter photo the other day for a drawing assignment. Once the picture is in black and white and printed I will paint on an imagined forest of food and medicines. We’re looking forward to spring!

Once we got the stove and stove pipe installed in October we’ve been keeping the yurt warm with just wood, body heat when we are in the yurt and any residual heat from the propane stove top or oven.

We live in the growing zone 5a. Winter temps range from -20C all the way up to the + degrees and its not windy here. This  year January and February have had a surprising (so I am told) amount of -20 nights.  Its been good for enjoying skating on the pond but for the most part its -10 at night and up to 0 degrees during the day.

I remember my folks burning a few cords a year in Quebec with electricity on low. When harvesting wood for the upcoming winter we wondered how much we would use… 1 cord (a stack of wood 4x4x8ft), or maybe 2 cords?

For us this year – not the case. Since October we have burned the stack below x2. It is nearing the end of February and we are currently working on our third stack.

Thank you energy forest for your life and warmth!

wood burning in the yurt

For scale, notice the splitter axe on the left? Pretty small pile eh? This will last several weeks!

It turns out the 6 inches of wool insulation in the walls, the 6 inches of mismatched recycle insulation in the floor and the six inches of styrofoam in the roof was a warm idea.